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Morgan Spence (lab alumnus)

Position: Former 
PhD Student (2015-2017)
Email: morgan.spence@uqconnect.edu.au


PhD Supervisors

Associate Professor Paul Dux (primary)
Professor
Jason Mattingley


PhD research

My research investigates the neural computations governing perceptual decisional confidence in humans, specifically:
  • How sensory signals are integrated and transformed during perceptual decision making to generate a reportable confidence estimate, and
  • How these neural computations differ between and within an individual/individuals or across different perceptual decisions.

Published papers

Spence, M. L., Dux, P. E. & Arnold, D. H. (2016). Computations underlying confidence in visual perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 42(5), 671-682. doi: 10.1037/xhp0000179

Keane, B., Spence, M. L., Yarrow, K. & Arnold, D. H. (2015). Perceptual confidence demonstrates trial-by-trial insight into the precision of audio–visual timing encoding. Consciousness & Cognition, 38, 107-117. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2015.10.010


Spence, M. L., Storrs, K. R. & Arnold, D. H. (2014). Why the long face? The importance of vertical image structure in biological ‘barcodes’ underlying face recognition. Journal of Vision, 14(8):25, 1-12. doi: 10.1167/14.8.25


Conference presentations

Spence, M., Dux, P. & Arnold, D. (2016). Signal Variability Undermines Confidence in Visual Perception. Paper presented at the Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision in Fremantle, Western Australia.
Awarded Student Talk Prize.

Spence, M., Dux, P. & Arnold, D. (2015). Computations underlying confidence. Paper presented at the UQ Centre for Perception and Cognitive Neuroscience (CPCN) Annual Workshop, Brisbane, Australia.

Spence, M., Dux, P. & Arnold, D. (2015). Confidence in visual perception. Paper presented at the 42nd Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, Sydney, Australia.
Awarded Student Talk Prize.

Spence, M., Dux, P. & Arnold, D. (2015). Confidence in Visual Perception. Poster presented at the Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, St. Pete’s Beach, Florida.

Spence, M., Storrs, K. & Arnold, D. (2014). Why the long face? The importance of vertical image structure in biological ‘barcodes’ for face recognition. Paper presented at the 41st Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

Spence, M., Storrs, K. & Arnold, D. (2014). Why the long face? Poster presented at the Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, St. Pete’s Beach, Florida.

Spence, M., Storrs, K. & Arnold, D. (2013). Why the long face? Paper presented at the UQ Centre for Perception and Cognitive Neuroscience (CPCN) Annual Workshop, Brisbane, Australia.