Mattingley Lab Home‎ > ‎Lab Members‎ > ‎

Dr. Matthew F. Tang

Position:
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Email: m.tang1@uq.edu.au


Current research

So far, my research has been broadly focused around two main areas. Firstly, how limitations in visual attention can be overcome, which has been addressed by examining how expectations about the timing of targets can help overcome the attentional blink. Secondly, I have examined how visual form and motion information interact in the early-to-mid visual system, by using psychophysics, modeling and non-invasive brain stimulation.


Research interests
  • Visual attention, predictions and expectations
  • The interaction between visual form and motion information
  • The effects of non-invasive brain stimulation on visual perception

Published papers


Tang, M. F., Hammond, G. R., & Badcock, D. R. (2016). Are participants aware of the type and intensity of transcranial direct current stimulation? PLoS ONE 11(2): e0148825. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0148825

Tang, M. F., Dickinson, J. E., Visser, T. A. W., Edwards, M., & Badcock, D. R. (2015). Role of form information in motion pooling and segmentation. Journal of Vision, 15(15), 19. doi:10.1167/15.15.19

Tang, M. F., Dickinson, J. E., Visser, T. A. W., & Badcock, D. R. (2015). The broad orientation dependence of the motion streak aftereffect reveals interactions between form and motion neurons. Journal of Vision, 15(13), 4. doi:10.1167/15.13.4

Visser, T. A. W., Tang, M. F., Badcock, D. R., & Enns, J. T. (2014). Temporal cues and the attentional blink: A further examination of the role of expectancy in sequential object perception. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 76(8):2212-2220. doi:10.3758/s13414-014-0710-7

Tang, M. F., Badcock, D. R., & Visser, T. A. W. (2014). Training and the attentional blink: limits overcome or expectations raised? Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21(2), 406-411. doi:10.3758/s13423-013-0491-3

Tang, M. F., Dickinson, J. E., Visser, T. A. W., Edwards, M., & Badcock, D. R. (2013). The shape of motion perception: Global pooling of transformational apparent motion. Journal of Vision, 13(13), 1-20. doi:10.1167/13.13.20

Tang, M. F., & Hammond, G. R. (2013). Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over auditory cortex degrades frequency discrimination by affecting temporal, but not place, coding. The European Journal of Neuroscience. 38(5), 2802-2811. doi:10.1111/ejn.12280